A Roll of Film in Old Delhi (Part 2)

Sitting down across the street from the entrance to an old Mosque, I shoot pictures on the street.

Leica M6 TTL Camera. Kodak Tri-X Black and White Film pushed to ISO 1600.

A peanut seller appears with his cart.

First Customer

A heavy load

The Peanut Man

Group of women pass

Young girl wants to buy peanuts

Taking a stroll

Another Rickshaw passes

Another Customer

Some Poor Mother

On the corner is a juice bar.

And the busy street full of confusion

Even more lovely confusion ahead. A dynamic country!

All shots with a Leica M6 TTL Camera. Leica Summarit 35 mm f 2.5 Lens. Kodak Tri-X Black and White film. Developed with Kodak HC-110 Developer. Film pushed to ISO 1600. 

A Roll of Film in OId Delhi

Sitting down in the same spot and shooting a roll of film just across from a mosque in a street in Old Delhi.

All pictures shot with a Leica M6 TTL Camera. Leica Summarit 35 mm f 2.5 Lens.

Kodak Tri-X Film (Shot at ISO 1600). Kodak HC-110 Developer. December 2018.

A Rickshaw passes with two ladies.

Delivering Propane gas the hard way.

A milk vendor arrives.

Humping Rickshaw puller. Poor guy.

On Foot, maybe travelling.

In the constant stream of Rickshaws.

Women pass.

This section is almost all Moslem.

On the Street

Checking things out.

Bags of flour to the bakery.

Rickshaw School bus

More kids going home

The Squint

On the Road Again

Father and Daughter

 

 

 

Some Street Pictures of Kolkata (Calcutta)

These pictures were taken in December 2018 in Kolkata (Calcutta). I like to use the old name of the city, Calcutta, better. I guess I just got used to that. A great city, which would be educational for anyone to visit.

These pictures were made with my cell phone. I normally shoot film, but I was running out of film, so I had to take some pictures that way.

A street scene with an old classical building. Part of the picture is underexposed, due to the shitty quality one sometimes gets with a cell phone.

Selling fresh coconuts on the street. These are cut open for the juice inside. Much more healthy that drinking Coke or Pepsi.

An ice cream vendor in the evening.

There are still these old-fashioned types of rickshaws on the streets. It seems that they should be banned, but they provide some way for some people to make a sort of living. Personally, I would not want to take one of these. It just seems too inhumane. 

Inside an old Hindustan Ambassador taxi. I love these old cars, based on a 1940s British model. They are like something out of the 1950s. They are no longer made in India. The drivers put their little Hindu gods and goddesses on the dash board. Amusing. They are supposed to be metered, but generally, one just agrees to a price to go somewhere.

Alongside a city bus. Some of the public transport buses are in quite poor shape and incredibly crowded.

I am not sure if this emergency exit would be very useful in the event of an accident. It might just be a case of bending over and kissing one’s sweet ass goodbye. WB is West Bengal state.

A large mosque in a Moslem section of the city. Some people do not realize that a large number of Moslems live in India. In fact, it is a major Moslem country in terms of numbers of Moslems. It is the Nakhoda Masjid (Mosque). 

An older man in traditional Islamic dress. Don’t think there is any danger to foreigners here. People are fine and quite friendly. So one can feel quite at home, if that person is used to living and travelling in foreign countries.

A typical street-food place in Calcutta. It is a cheap place to eat and usually the food is quite good. On a holiday, it might not be the best idea. One must be acclimatized to Indian food.

The entrance to Nakhoda Mosque. Personally, I generally avoid anything having to do with religion. It makes life a hell of a lot easier.

A street in front of the Mosque.

This poor son of a bitch is having a hard day every day. Why wouldn’t he be wise to welcome a communist revolution? Actually the Marxists ruled West Bengal for many years, but didn’t do enough for the masses. If one compares this with China, one has to appreciate what a great success Mao was in modernizing China. Almost everything that Americans use these days is made in China. 

A calendar in Urdu, English and probably Hindi. The print is a little hard to make out.

These bananas are very tasty as they are generally ripened naturally and grown locally. Fruit is plentiful all through the year.

Indian capitalism has turned this poor guy into a human draft animal. Shouldn’t he be loyal to an economic system that treats him worse than a horse or a bullock? Where is the claim for justice and human rights? Why would such a person be worse off under communism? 

Another street seller. He is an entrepreneur. 

Another old classical building, now falling into decay. Want to compare this to what one sees in Shanghai? Now who says that Mao was not successful in developing China. Mao laid the foundation for capitalist China today. Yes, it is capitalist, but east Asian state-guided capitalism, not the wild west yahoo capitalism that has ripped the USA to hell. In the USA, corporate capitalists are the ruling class. Bezos with Amazon made profits of eight billion and is paying no taxes at all to the state. Now that is a hell of a ruling class. A hell of a democracy!

Getting fat with street profits.

Street scene, Calcutta. One might want to take a trip to Calcutta and see how Indian capitalism is treating the masses. One might learn some things that are not taught by professors in Economics 101. Most of those teaching the courses have never ever taken a trip outside the USA! That could make one think a little bit about what is going on in the world.

 

 

 

 

Basmane: A Traditional Section of Izmir, Turkey With Pictures

Basmane (Izmir, Turkey): Historical Smyrna

by Eddie James Girdner

In the nineteenth century, Basmane was a factory area. Basmane Railway Station was built between 1864 and 1866 for the Smyrna Cassaba Railway, which ran from Izmir to Turgutlu. In 1934 it became part of the Turkish State Railway system.

Today, Basmane is a traditional area of small shops, restaurants and hotels along historical Anafartalar Street. In the last few years, the area has changed with the coming of Syrian refugees. Many shops have been taken over by these new immigrants. It is a colourful and interesting area of the city, which is shown in these images.

All pictures were taken with a Leica M6 TTL camera with black and white film.

Basmane Railway Station, the main railway station in Izmir for Turkish State Railways.

A kokorec Vender in Basmane

Selling Nuts

Selling Simits near a historical fountain (Cesme). It is across the street from the Mosque.

One finds the most interesting mix of people in Basmane, it seems.

A very rich shop.

Selling Sweets

Passengers Arrive

Mobile Shop, selling dried okra, tomatoes, egg plant and so on.

Roll Your Own Tobacco for Cigarettes. Giving the Ultranationalist Wolf Salute of the Nationalist Action Party (MHP)

Out For a Stroll. Might be the happiest time of their lives.

A Saturday Afternoon Walk

A Square Near the Mosque

The Street

Street Scene

Waiting for a bite to eat.

For most, its a scramble for a living. Off to make a sale. These are the kind of poor people that America bombs in the Middle East. They are just simple people.

Plenty in the market, if one has the do ray me.

Homeward Bound

Man ain’t nothin but just a hoping machine (Woody Guthrie).

Many residents have come to the city from villages in the east of the country.

Local Restaurant on the Street

Used Clothes market in the Square. There are many Syrian Refugees, thanks to the war caused by the USA in Iraq and later Syria. The hell with democracy. They are just trying to save their lives.

Nothing like a good ear of sweet corn, anywhere in the world.

The Fruit Man Cometh

Night Shot of the Grand Corner Hotel across from the Railway Station.

That’s a little piece of old Basmane (Izmir, Turkey) or Historical Smyrna.

Its a great city.

Its a hell of a city.

 

 

The Howrah Bridge in Calcutta (Kolkata)

The mighty Howrah Bridge in Calcutta is the lifeline between the city of Howrah on the West side of the Hooghly River and Calcutta on the East. There is a massive amount of traffic, vehicles and pedestrians every day.

These pictures were taken on December 8, 2018. I walked across the bridge from Calcutta and back with the crowds of pedestrians. It is worth doing to get a feel of this great city.

These pictures were taken with my fifty-year old Minolta camera with a 28 mm Vivitar lens. I developed the film myself. Sometimes old things work better.

A constant stream of people are walking across the bridge.

An impressive sight. The massive bridge shakes from time to time as one walks across it.

On the way up to the walkway of the bridge.

The masses.

The regulations against vending on the approaches to the bridge are conveniently ignored, it seems. In some cases, at least.

A constant stream of traffic and people.

It is about one third of a mile across the bridge.

I was actually supposed to be crossing on the opposite side of the bridge, to the left.

It is sometimes very crowded.

There is a place for relieving one’s self before making the trek. I took a picture clandestinely.

The famous flower market under the bridge.

A lot of goods cross on heads, for sure.

And on shoulders.

Old and crowded buses. But they still work.

It is a city full of life and activity and one must be cautious to keep from getting run over. Light crossings often do not work. I was rather stuck here. The best way to get across the street is to join a jaywalking crowd and hope for the best.

Colorful old trams that sometimes run off the rails. It is a wonder how they keep going.

Coconuts cut open for drinking the juice. Plentiful fruits.

Plates of fruit, papaya, watermelon, banana and so on sold under the bridge.

After doing a lot of trekking around India, I always wanted to take this trek through Calcutta. A great and vibrant city full of life and of course, great wealth and great poverty.

India is a sort of photographer’s paradise. Every meter of the city is another interesting picture. It must be the greatest place in the world to do street photography. If one has the energy, that is. December is a pleasant time of the year.

 

 

A Walk Around Hilal Village

Hilal Village is on the Northeast edge of Izmir, Turkey, on the Metro line. I took a walk there with my old Minolta Camera and made some pictures on April 23, 2018. It is a quite poor village with some Gypsies.

There is a local railway line that comes past the village.

There is a ramp down to the village from the Metro Line.

Looking down on a poor family’s rooftop terrace.

An old abandoned house.

 

A small mosque in the village.

A simple village house.

A street scene.

Houses are poor, but often colorful.

Much religious conservatism too.

A village peddler, without many customers.I buy some pairs of socks from him.

Another peddler selling simits.

Some village youth.

A wall design. Some of the houses were more elegant in the past.

A village house, using old Agfa HDC 100 film that expired some 20 years ago. The film gives an interesting color to the houses.

Peace of Mind Cafe in the village.

Above the shops, once a nice building that could be restored.

The main street in the village.

One of the patrons of the local coffee shop.

Friendly locals at the village coffee shop.

Locals at a game.

A village doner kebab shop.

Old Tree and village dogs.

Some village kids.

Some young girls, probably Gypsies, and young boy.

Some local Gypsies. The villagers were friendly and treated me at the local tea house, where I spent some time with them. But one man got upset when his young daughter wanted me to take her picture. He ran out into the street shouting at her. So I quickly said I was not taking a picture of her. The Gypsies, on the other hand wanted me to take their pictures.Most of the residents of the village are poor, but seem to not be doing too badly.

 

 

Fifteen Pictures of Izmir at Night

Basmane Train Station

Station Front

Hotels Across from Night Clubs

Restaurants across from the station. 

Grand Corner Hotel across from the station

Night Scene Near Station

Quick Food Place

Sweets Shop

A Popular place, but all men!

A Kokorec Place

Another Street

Dress Shop

The Other Side of Town- Places to Eat and Drink

Dedicated Drinking Places on the Street

Street with outside tables

A city surely dedicated to pleasure

Pictures taken with Leica M6 TTL Camera. Leica Summarit-M 35 mm lens. Ilford HP 5 plus film shot at ISO 1600. Film developed with Kodak HC-110 Developer.

April 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Divisions in Izmir, Turkey

Part 1: Kemeralti and Basmane

Kemeralti- A huge bazaar with a maze of streets and hundreds of shops selling almost everything. It is next to Clock Tower Square in Konak. Easy to get lost.

Along Anafartalar Caddesi that runs from Basmane Train Station to Kemeralti. It is a more downscale area. Most people are poor. There has been a large influx of Syrian refugees in recent years. Many of them are now running shops in the area.

Women along Anafartalar Caddesi in late afternoon.

Shoppers in Havra Sokak Fish Market. (Synagogue Street) At one time before World War I, this was a Jewish area and there are some synagogues in the area that are now closed. This covered street is mostly a fish, meat, and vegetable market, but other things as well. Fascinating place, always busy.

Shopkeeper and friend.

Shoppers in Kemeralti

Havra Sokak Scene

Alsancak-The upscale west side near the sea. A crowded restaurant.

One of many popular pub-restaurants in the old area of Alsancak. Crowded every night. Hard to get a seat.

The wide mall, closed to traffic, is crowded every evening. Many shops and restaurants for upscale shoppers.

Young women in Sardunya, a beautiful historical pub.

Evening crowds on the mall. 

The buses, trams, metro and ferry boats are all free if one is over 65. But who would ever tell you that about Turkey!