The Howrah Bridge in Calcutta (Kolkata)

The mighty Howrah Bridge in Calcutta is the lifeline between the city of Howrah on the West side of the Hooghly River and Calcutta on the East. There is a massive amount of traffic, vehicles and pedestrians every day.

These pictures were taken on December 8, 2018. I walked across the bridge from Calcutta and back with the crowds of pedestrians. It is worth doing to get a feel of this great city.

These pictures were taken with my fifty-year old Minolta camera with a 28 mm Vivitar lens. I developed the film myself. Sometimes old things work better.

A constant stream of people are walking across the bridge.

An impressive sight. The massive bridge shakes from time to time as one walks across it.

On the way up to the walkway of the bridge.

The masses.

The regulations against vending on the approaches to the bridge are conveniently ignored, it seems. In some cases, at least.

A constant stream of traffic and people.

It is about one third of a mile across the bridge.

I was actually supposed to be crossing on the opposite side of the bridge, to the left.

It is sometimes very crowded.

There is a place for relieving one’s self before making the trek. I took a picture clandestinely.

The famous flower market under the bridge.

A lot of goods cross on heads, for sure.

And on shoulders.

Old and crowded buses. But they still work.

It is a city full of life and activity and one must be cautious to keep from getting run over. Light crossings often do not work. I was rather stuck here. The best way to get across the street is to join a jaywalking crowd and hope for the best.

Colorful old trams that sometimes run off the rails. It is a wonder how they keep going.

Coconuts cut open for drinking the juice. Plentiful fruits.

Plates of fruit, papaya, watermelon, banana and so on sold under the bridge.

After doing a lot of trekking around India, I always wanted to take this trek through Calcutta. A great and vibrant city full of life and of course, great wealth and great poverty.

India is a sort of photographer’s paradise. Every meter of the city is another interesting picture. It must be the greatest place in the world to do street photography. If one has the energy, that is. December is a pleasant time of the year.

 

 

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A Walk Around Hilal Village

Hilal Village is on the Northeast edge of Izmir, Turkey, on the Metro line. I took a walk there with my old Minolta Camera and made some pictures on April 23, 2018. It is a quite poor village with some Gypsies.

There is a local railway line that comes past the village.

There is a ramp down to the village from the Metro Line.

Looking down on a poor family’s rooftop terrace.

An old abandoned house.

 

A small mosque in the village.

A simple village house.

A street scene.

Houses are poor, but often colorful.

Much religious conservatism too.

A village peddler, without many customers.I buy some pairs of socks from him.

Another peddler selling simits.

Some village youth.

A wall design. Some of the houses were more elegant in the past.

A village house, using old Agfa HDC 100 film that expired some 20 years ago. The film gives an interesting color to the houses.

Peace of Mind Cafe in the village.

Above the shops, once a nice building that could be restored.

The main street in the village.

One of the patrons of the local coffee shop.

Friendly locals at the village coffee shop.

Locals at a game.

A village doner kebab shop.

Old Tree and village dogs.

Some village kids.

Some young girls, probably Gypsies, and young boy.

Some local Gypsies. The villagers were friendly and treated me at the local tea house, where I spent some time with them. But one man got upset when his young daughter wanted me to take her picture. He ran out into the street shouting at her. So I quickly said I was not taking a picture of her. The Gypsies, on the other hand wanted me to take their pictures.Most of the residents of the village are poor, but seem to not be doing too badly.

 

 

Fifteen Pictures of Izmir at Night

Basmane Train Station

Station Front

Hotels Across from Night Clubs

Restaurants across from the station. 

Grand Corner Hotel across from the station

Night Scene Near Station

Quick Food Place

Sweets Shop

A Popular place, but all men!

A Kokorec Place

Another Street

Dress Shop

The Other Side of Town- Places to Eat and Drink

Dedicated Drinking Places on the Street

Street with outside tables

A city surely dedicated to pleasure

Pictures taken with Leica M6 TTL Camera. Leica Summarit-M 35 mm lens. Ilford HP 5 plus film shot at ISO 1600. Film developed with Kodak HC-110 Developer.

April 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Divisions in Izmir, Turkey

Part 1: Kemeralti and Basmane

Kemeralti- A huge bazaar with a maze of streets and hundreds of shops selling almost everything. It is next to Clock Tower Square in Konak. Easy to get lost.

Along Anafartalar Caddesi that runs from Basmane Train Station to Kemeralti. It is a more downscale area. Most people are poor. There has been a large influx of Syrian refugees in recent years. Many of them are now running shops in the area.

Women along Anafartalar Caddesi in late afternoon.

Shoppers in Havra Sokak Fish Market. (Synagogue Street) At one time before World War I, this was a Jewish area and there are some synagogues in the area that are now closed. This covered street is mostly a fish, meat, and vegetable market, but other things as well. Fascinating place, always busy.

Shopkeeper and friend.

Shoppers in Kemeralti

Havra Sokak Scene

Alsancak-The upscale west side near the sea. A crowded restaurant.

One of many popular pub-restaurants in the old area of Alsancak. Crowded every night. Hard to get a seat.

The wide mall, closed to traffic, is crowded every evening. Many shops and restaurants for upscale shoppers.

Young women in Sardunya, a beautiful historical pub.

Evening crowds on the mall. 

The buses, trams, metro and ferry boats are all free if one is over 65. But who would ever tell you that about Turkey! 

 

Some Memories of Yunan

Buddhist Temple with the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain behind.

The old town of Lijaing. It is clear that tourism has greatly developed since I was there in 2007. The connection is through Kunming. Lijiang is some 100 km further. A big tourist attraction is the Tiger Leaping Gorge in the Jinsha River that flows into the Yangtze. It seems that the trekking trails were not developed in those days. I was on a study tour of China. Our bus stopped at one point and we descended a steep narrow trail down to the rapids. The climb back up was difficult. Some on the tour paid to be carried down and back up. Now many trekking trails have been developed. A great adventure if one is younger. It is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and incredibly scenic.

The River.

Shop in the old town of Lijiang. 

The monastery at Shangri La (Zhongdian). The name was changed to Shangri La to attract tourists, it seems. 

Inside the old town of Shangri La. The town goes back some 1300 years. I guess I was lucky to get some pictures because most of this old town burned down in January 2014. It was a tragedy for tourism.